Hearings: A ReaderContour Biennale 8

The Contour Biennale 8, “Polyphonic Worlds: Justice as Medium,” curated by Natasha Ginwala, brings together twenty-five artists and art collectives working in lens-based media, sound, performance, drawing, and installation. The accompanying reader Hearings comprises texts orginally published on the eponymous online journal that traces the artistic processes, conceptual methods, and historical research through textual as well as image and video-based contributions from a range of artists, writers, poets, anthropologists, and filmmakers.



Cecilia VicuñaRead Thread
The Story of the Red Thread


From the 1970s to the present, Cecilia Vicuña’s work has engaged with rituals from Aboriginal Australia, South Africa, Paleolithic Europe, and pre-Columbian America involving red-colored thread. The Chilean artist’s performances, site-specific installations, paintings, and drawings relate to the symbolic function of textile and language as well as the ritual dimension of menstrual blood in the construction of solidarity through femininity and maternity, to support and continue life. Appearing on the occasion of Vicuña’s installation in Athens for documenta 14, Read Thread tells the story of the sanguine thread in Vicuña’s work.



Shirana ShahbaziFirst Things First

The catalogue First Things First comprises a selection of images from a number of Shirana Shahbazi’s photographic series created over the past ten years. The presentation of some fifty works is not necessarily categorically or linearly organized; rather, it appears completely free of hierarchy, with photographic styles, subjects, and techniques displayed on equal footing. First Things First emphasizes a juxtapositional approach, a dynamic and free arrangement of various subjects and styles.



Merlin CarpenterMIDCAREER PAINTINGS

Merlin Carpenter’s exhibition “MIDCAREER PAINTINGS” filled Kunsthalle Bern’s rooms with transit blankets stretched over identically scaled frames, each named after one of the artist's seven galleries and marked "not for sale." This publication documents these "paintings," the particular mix of playfulness and earnestness in Carpenter's art, and how the works thematize the limbo of the "midcareer" artist as well as the circulation of the artwork as a commodity that signifies material wealth or value.




Ernesto Neto and the Huni KuinAru Kuxipa—Sacred Secret

“Aru Kuxipa,” the exhibition held at TBA21 – Augarten, was a vibrant demonstration of ancestral futures, a term that unpacks potentials for creating a future that is also deeply rooted in cultures of tradition. Through multiple exchanges between members of thirty-two Huni Kuin communities in Brazil, this publication brings together threads from anthropology, art, and science that are interwoven, like the movement of a serpent, with essay contributions, oral histories, drawings, and traditional song. Together, they outline the way unique kinships produced within an indigenous cosmo-vision can shape our present moment



Roee RosenLive and Die as Eva Braun and Other Intimate Stories

Live and Die as Eva Braun and Other Intimate Stories is a bilingual edition of short writings by Roee Rosen. At the heart of this collection are three provocative texts extracted from important artworks by Rosen, offered here as genre-defying literature at the intersection between reality and fiction, speculative narrative and historical-political critique, humor and eroticism.



Olaf Holzapfel / Nahum TevetThe Rough Law of Gardens

The Rough Law of Gardens documents Olaf Holzapfel and Nahum Tevet’s eponymous joint exhibition and explores the intergenerational differences between two unique artists. Both artists’ work rejects the global logic of growth and traverses the bounds of sculpture and painting: each of their practices involves ideas to do with materiality, learning, and memory.



Armen AvanessianOverwrite
Ethics of Knowledge—Poetics of Existence


The original ideals of the Enlightenment research university and the rise of aesthetics in modernity have been decisive in shaping neoliberal capitalism. How, then, might we endeavor to change the academic status quo? Philosopher and political theorist Armen Avanessian argues that the ethical dimension of knowledge can produce a new reality. Looking beyond aesthetics and its critical imagination, can the speculative poetics of collaborative writing free us from the dominant regime of the academy and, by extension, the art world?




Mario Garcí­a TorresAn Arrival Tale

Appropriation, storytelling, reenactment, and reportage are some of the strategies that Mario García Torres deploys to highlight the limitations of factual evidence and the agency of historical records and objects. An Arrival Tale detaches the Mexican artist’s works in the TBA21 collection from their original contexts and offers them as a collection of narratives and artistic experiments open for reinscription in order to address the conditions and urgencies of our contemporary societies. It examines the space of arrival as a complicated and disjointed nexus between departure, displacement, and return.



Sven LüttickenCultural Revolution
Aesthetic Practice after Autonomy


In this collection of essays, art historian and critic Sven Lütticken focuses on aesthetic practice in a rapidly expanding cultural sphere. He analyzes its transformation by the capitalist cultural revolution, whose reshaping of art’s autonomy has wrought a field of afters and posts. In a present moment teeming with erosions—where even history and the human are called into question—Cultural Revolution: Aesthetic Practice after Autonomy reconsiders these changing values, for relegating such notions safely to the past betrays their possibilities for potential today.



Minouk LimUnited Paradox

What role does historiography play in the formation of the present? How does contemporary experience inform the commemoration of historical events or lack thereof? Minouk Lim explores history in the present tense—its media representation, collective memory, ritual, and trauma—through her exhibition, publication, and broadcasting station United Paradox.



Dave Hullfish Bailey + Sam WatsonCityCat Project 2006–2016

CityCat Project 2006–2016 is the record of an extraordinary collaboration between American artist Dave Hullfish Bailey and senior Aboriginal writer and activist Sam Watson. The collaboration is structured around Maiwar Performance, in which the CityCat ferries that ply the Brisbane River (Maiwar) execute unannounced maneuvers near a site of significance to the Aboriginal people who lived on the lands around Brisbane before British colonization in the early nineteenth century.



Helke BayrlePortikus Under Construction 1992–2016

In 1992, Helke Bayrle began videotaping the installation of each exhibition at the Portikus exhibition space. These videos form a remarkable and intimate archive of the storied Frankfurt contemporary art institution and the exceptional artists and personnel that have worked within it. Coinciding with the launch of a website containing all of Bayrle’s Portikus videos, this publication pays tribute to the artist’s extraordinary work, through a comprehensive timeline, video stills, and statements by past and current directors and curators.



Thomas Keenan, Suhail Malik, Tirdad Zolghadr (Eds.)The Flood of Rights

It is difficult to imagine making claims for human rights without using images. For better or worse, images of protest, evidence, and assertion are the lingua franca of struggles for justice today. And they seem to come in a flood, more and more, day and night. But through which channels does the torrent pass? The Flood of Rights examines the pathways through which these images and ideas circulate—routes that do not merely enable, but actually shape human-rights claims and their conceptual background.




Edgar LeciejewskiTones

Edgar Leciejewski spent six months as an artist-in-residence with Fogo Island Arts in 2014. Tones brings together new work stemming from the Leipzig-based artist’s time on the island, including large-scale collages, photographs of natural elements, and precarious sculptures composed of objects found on the shore. Taken together the works are a collection and an archive of time shown in modern images, raising questions on how we contemplate ideas of nature. This publication features essays by Bill Arning and Zoë Gray, as well as a conversation between the artist and Nicolaus Schafhausen.



Reto PulferZustandskatalog: Catalog of States and Conditions

In the style of a catalogue raisonné, Reto Pulfer’s comprehensive monograph, Zustandskatalog: Catalog of States and Conditions, follows the artist’s work over the past fifteen years. Excerpts from the artist’s novels as well as insightful texts by Anselm Franke and Benoît Maire are juxtaposed with 475 documentary photographs of Pulfer’s technical drawings, one-off exhibitions, large-scale installations, and performances. Categories such as living ceramics, food advice, ghostology, synesthesia, and transformation are woven throughout the book, giving unique insight into the ideas and imagination that are part of the work itself.



Luca Lo Pinto (Ed.)One, No One and One Hundred Thousand

This publication documents the 2016 exhibition “One, No One and One Hundred Thousand,” which took place at Kunsthalle Wien, Karlsplatz. Curated by Luca Lo Pinto, the show took its inspiration from Oulipo, a literary strategy whose objective was to propose new “structures” for writing that were mathematical in nature. Using A Thousand Billion Poems, a 1961 book by Raymond Queneau, one of Oulipo’s founders, as a manifesto for the exhibition, nine artists were invited to create new works in a display that would change depending on the wishes of the visitor.



Marcus VerhagenFlows and Counterflows
Globalisation in Contemporary Art


Over the past quarter century, artists have made powerful interventions in debates around globalisation, addressing various dimensions of cross-border exchange, from mass migration to the dynamics of translation, and devising new ways of conceptualising them. Marcus Verhagen’s Flows and Counterflows: Globalisation in Contemporary Art tells the story of those interventions, dwelling in particular on projects that draw out both the dangers and the tangible or imaginable benefits of global exchange.



Goldin+SennebyThe Exquisite Corpse of August Nordenskiöld

In the ancient art of alchemy, some elements can change to other states of matter while others cannot. At least not without magic. And a touch of trickery. For some time now, Goldin+Senneby have been interested in a utopian alchemist named August Nordenskiöld (1754–1792) who sought to create enough gold from inferior metals to permanently abolish its value, and the tyranny of money with it. The Exquisite Corpse of August Nordenskiöld contains seven essays written by a historian of ideas, a sociologist of finance, a literary and cultural historian, a stage magician, an artist, an anthropologist, and a poet.



Robert Stadler, Alexis Vaillant (Eds.)On Things as Ideas

This collection of more than thirty texts, which were originally published between 1790 and the present day, explores man’s rich relationship with material things. Devised largely in response to the gradual breakdown of the divide between art and design that began over a century ago, this book sheds light on the ways that the concept of the thing as idea has been considered over time.



Sara van der HeideThe German Library Pyongyang
Die deutsche Informationsbibliothek Pjöngjang


For the 1st Asia Biennial/5th Guangzhou Triennial, artist Sara van der Heide converted a public library in Guangzhou, China, into a restaging of the Goethe-Institut's German Library and Information Centre of Pyongyang, which operated from 2004 to 2009. Van der Heide’s German Library was to offer a set of public cultural programs: a group exhibition, video program, performances, and seminar. However, at the last minute the project was censored by the Chinese Cultural Bureau, turning what was to be an investigation of libraries and the institutional sharing of culture into an intimate reflection on power and censorship, political art, and the historical experiences shared across formerly divided Germany and the two Koreas.



Joanna Warsza (Ed.)I Can’t Work Like This
A Reader on Recent Boycotts and Contemporary Art


In recent years, artists and curators have often been confronted with the political dilemma of engagement or disengagement. The ideological, economic, or ethically objectionable circumstances of certain biennials and art exhibitions have raised the question of whether to continue and, if so, under what circumstances, with what consequences, and to what ends? From 2013 to 2015, biennials in Istanbul, St. Petersburg, Sydney, and São Paulo demonstrated that curating and art production can’t just carry on as if nothing had happened.



Daniel Birnbaum, Kim WestLife on Sirius
The Situationist International and the Exhibition after Art


How did art escape the deadlock of the Situationists’ anti-art refusal? Did the relational artists, with their repetitions of Situationist slogans and techniques, outline a sustainable, micro-political alternative to Guy Debord’s dream of surpassing art and realizing philosophy? Looking back at some of the Situationists’ confrontations with the museum, this book traces a path beyond the tragedy of negativity and the litany of recuperation.



Ryan Bishop, Kristoffer Gansing, Jussi Parikka, Elvia Wilk (Eds.)across & beyond
A transmediale Reader on Post-digital Practices, Concepts, and Institutions


This collection of art and theory analyzes today’s post-digital conditions for critical media practices—across and beyond the analog and the digital, the human and the nonhuman. The contributions also look across and beyond the field of media art, staking out new paths for understanding and working in the transversal territories between theory, technology, and art.



Jesse Birch (Ed.)Black Diamond Dust

This publication expands a 2014 multisite contemporary art exhibition that took place in Nanaimo, British Columbia, a small city on the eastern edge of Vancouver Island. The title refers to coal mining, an industry that has formed and fragmented communities through economic development, racial segregation, and labor inequity, while fueling the modern world. In this book, forgotten or under-acknowledged histories are investigated and discussed along with cultural forms that surround the practices of international coal mining. Contemporary artworks, poetry, essays, literature, folk songs, and archival images come together to extract meaning from this fossilized black carbon that continues to power our cities.



Eva Barois De Caevel, Els Roelandt (Eds.)CATPC
Cercle d’art des travailleurs de plantation congolaise
Congolese Plantation Workers Art League


This book offers a first report on the activities of the Cercle d’art des travailleurs de plantation congolaise (CATPC), an association based in Lusanga, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. CATPC brings together a unique gathering of individuals—along with its members and partner institutions that are engaged in dialogue with it—and attempts to rethink postcolonial power relations within the global art world.



Bulletins of The Serving Library #12Winter 2016/17

This issue comprises various outlooks on “perspective.” This might be taken to mean something as specific as a particular opinion or as general as an axonometric projection; in short, different ways and means of looking at the world. And so we find Vincenzo Latronico attempting to get in touch with E.T., a collection of Lucy McKenzie’s illusory quodlibets, a conversation between Jumana Manna and Robert Wyatt on art and ethics, along with other points of view from Sarah Demeuse, Mark de Silva, Jocelyn Penny Small, Abigail Reynolds, James Langdon & Mathew Kneebone, Johan Hjerpe, and the inimitable 9mother9horse9eyes9.



Alex Coles (Ed.)EP Vol. 2
Design Fiction


The second volume in the EP series identifies the current fascination with fiction across art, design, and architecture. Practitioners and theorists explore this strategy by pushing the debate into both speculative and real-fictitious terrains. Newly commissioned interviews, artist projects, and essays shed light on topics such as parafiction and algorithmic ambiguity. Included in the volume is one of the final interviews to be published with novelist and semiotician Umberto Eco; a conversation with Bruce Sterling, in which the science-fiction author responds to designers who reference his writings; and design theorist Vilém Flusser’s 1966 essay “On Fiction,” in its first English translation.



Chus Martí­nezClub Univers

This book is the result of ongoing research into historical and current artistic practices that explore new paradigms of experience. It is the first volume in a series of books that focuses on what is happening both inside and outside of the art institute.



Beatrice von Bismarck, Benjamin Meyer-Krahmer (Eds.)Cultures of the Curatorial 3
Hospitality: Hosting Relations in Exhibitions


A curatorial situation is always one of hospitality. This publication analyzes the curatorial within the current sociopolitical context, through key topics concerning immigration, conditions along borders, and accommodations for refugees. The contributions in this volume, by international curators, artists, critics, and theoreticians, deal with conditions of decontextualization and displacement, encounters between the local and the foreign, as well as the satisfaction of basic human needs.



Victor ManLuminary Petals on a Wet, Black Bough

Luminary Petals on a Wet, Black Bough is an artist’s book focusing on Victor Man’s series of paintings first exhibited as part of the 56th Venice Biennale in 2015, and later developed for a solo exhibition at Galeria Plan B, Berlin. The book includes essays by poet and translator Bogdan Ghiu, curator Mihnea Mircan, and literary critic Laura Pavel.



Eberhard HavekostInhalt

Inhalt concentrates on Eberhard Havekost’s painting from the past ten years, focusing on work first exhibited at KINDL – Centre for Contemporary Art, Berlin, in 2016/17. The work’s heterogeneity is evident in the selection of subjects, as well as the  styles employed. This extreme range characterizes Havekost’s artistic work as a whole. The artist situates his paintings in complex interrelationships, where connections and relevancies are constantly reconfigured, forming a continuously growing web.



Lydia OkumuraSituations

For almost fifty years, Lydia Okumura has explored the realm of geometric abstraction. She challenges our perception of space through sculptures, installations, and works on paper that blur distinctions between dimensions.



Spaces of CommoningArtistic Research and the Utopia of the Everyday

Spaces of Commoning: Artistic Research and the Utopia of the Everyday is the outcome of a research project pursued by a group of artists, architects, and social theorists. In the face of an exhilarating politics of accumulation and dispossession, the group explores commoning as the subject as well as the means of its study.



Darja BajagićUnlimited Hate

For her first institutional solo Darja Bajagić turns to the murky terrain where real and staged violence bleed into each other with an ease both unsettling and alluring. This has been a key undercurrent to a practice that spans painting, sculpture, video, and installation. Following the lure of the fringes, the artist culls her imagery from fan-gore magazines, true-crime TV shows, fetish websites, obscure online forums, and hidden chat rooms tucked away in the darker reaches of the Web.



Boris Groys (Ed.)Beyond the Globe
8th Triennial of Contemporary Art U3


In our cultural imagination, the cosmos is a harmonious, utopian universe, but it is also uncontrollable, even unknown, and the source of a specifically modern fear or uneasiness—one that could be described as “cosmic anxiety.” This catalogue presents many possibilities for the artistic exploration of the topic at hand: the connection between artistic and scientific imagination, the cosmos as analysis of sci-fi culture, perspectives of corporeal immortality, and the critique of contemporary technology.



Martin HerbertTell Them I Said No

This collection of essays by Martin Herbert considers various artists who have withdrawn from the art world or adopted an antagonistic position toward its mechanisms. A large part of the artist’s role in today’s professionalized art system is being present. Providing a counterargument to this concept of self-marketing, Herbert examines the nature of retreat, whether in protest, as a deliberate conceptual act, or out of necessity. By illuminating these motives, Tell Them I Said No offers a unique perspective on where and how the needs of the artist and the needs of the art world diverge. Essays on Lutz Bacher, Stanley Brouwn, Christopher D’Arcangelo, Trisha Donnelly, David Hammons, Agnes Martin, Cady Noland, Laurie Parsons, Charlotte Posenenske, and Albert York.




Hannah RickardsGrey light
Left and right back, high up, two small windows


Grey light. Left and right back, high up, two small windows is a major new work by London-based artist Hannah Rickards commissioned by Fogo Island Arts. The publication features texts by Melissa Gronlund and Will Holder and striking new photographic imagery drawn from the installation’s physical materials and production process. Like Rickards’s work, the publication aims to bridge the distance between visual experience and its expression in language, whether spoken, written, or gestural.



Anthony Downey (Ed.)Future Imperfect
Contemporary Art Practices and Cultural Institutions in the
Middle East


Future Imperfect critically examines the role played by cultural institutions in producing present-day and future contexts for the production, dissemination, and reception of contemporary art in the Middle East and North Africa. It offers historical contexts for discussions that have become increasingly urgent in recent years—the role of culture in a time of conflict and globalization—and an in-depth critique of the state of cultural institutions in an age of political upheaval, social unrest, exuberant cultural activity, ascendant neoliberal forms of privatization, social activism, and regional uncertainty.



Nathalie Du PasquierBIG OBJECTS NOT ALWAYS SILENT

Nathalie Du Pasquier was one of the founding members of Memphis, the groundbreaking Milanese design and architecture collective. Since 1987, however, her main focus and passion has been painting. The title of this publication describes the main focus of her work: the still life. It consists of an artist’s book by Du Pasquier with drawings, photographs, and reproductions of her paintings, and a book with photographs by Delfino Sisto Legnani of works from the past decades. Texts by writers and artists and an interview with Du Pasquier provide an informative and subjective view of her artistic practice.



Ute Meta Bauer, Brigitte Oetker (Eds.)SouthEastAsia
Spaces of the Curatorial/Räume des Kuratorischen
Jahresring 63


This publication focuses on the practice of curating in Southeast Asia, a region experiencing a time of increased global visibility as well as nation and institution building. The diversity of voices in this publication mirrors the complexity of the region itself: its various curatorial spaces, infrastructures, and political systems.



Margit BuschIF—THEN—ELSE. Welcome to Transciency
Preis der Kunsthalle Wien 2016


Addressing possible configurations of art and nature, Margit Busch, recipient of the Kunsthalle Wien Prize 2016, created a laboratory-cum-experiment that included mealworms and beetles that consume, and thus recycle, polystyrene plastic. By generating insights into the discipline of “transciency”—devoted to perspectives, research methods, and representations operating through and beyond science—Busch’s project sheds light on the meeting points of scientific, philosophical, artistic, and practical discourses.



Andrej PolukordThe Sarcophagus
Preis der Kunsthalle Wien 2016


Andrej Polukord, corecipient of the Kunsthalle Wien 2016 prize, draws on painting, installation, performance, and video art to create unpredictable environments and absurd situations that produce double meanings and ambiguity. Polukord installed The Sarcophagus at Kunsthalle Wien, an environment that takes the form of a cave. In this installation mushrooms grow from the ceiling of the Kunsthalle, transforming the gallery into the space of an inverted forest floor.



Sophia Yadong Hao, Edgar Schmitz (Eds.)Hubs and Fictions
On Current Art and Imported Remoteness


Hubs and Fictions, originally a touring forum, invited international curators, writers, and producers to probe how fiction plays out in a globally distributed art-world ecology, and how infrastructures are invented against its background. The book functions as a deliberately discontinuous reader; it juxtaposes documents, negotiations, and reflections from and on these conversations.



Monica RossEthical Actions
A Critical Fine Art Practice


British artist Monica Ross (1950–2013) left behind forty years of socially engaged, feminist, and performative artwork, which has had a deep effect on contemporary art and society. This fully illustrated publication documents Ross’s works from 1970 to 2013.



Boris GroysParticular Cases

This collection of essays does not aim to illustrate a prefabricated theory of art, but rather follows the impulses given by artworks themselves. Philosopher and art critic Boris Groys writes about significant artists and artworks of the last century that have pushed his thinking and writing in a new direction. His striking and original arguments do not try to substitute the singular content or message of an artwork. Rather, the writings are inspired by art as a mind-changing practice—as if contemporary artists, completely secularized, can still produce a sort of conversion within the spectator. 



Jan Paul Evers, Leon Kahane, Jumana Mannaars viva 2017

The ars viva Prize has been awarded annually since 1953 to young artists living in Germany whose work stands out for its innovative potential and high artistic quality. The recipients of this year’s prize are Jan Paul Evers, Leon Kahane, and Jumana Manna.



James RichardsRequests and Antisongs

Requests and Antisongs is an artist’s book to accompany a sequence of exhibitions by James Richards held at Bergen Kunsthall, Norway; Institute of Contemporary Arts, London; and the Kestner Gesellschaft, Hanover. The book contains a series of visual essays by the artist, documentation of recent exhibitions, as well as essays by Dan Fox, Ed Atkins, Steve Reinke, Chris McCormack, and Fatima Hellberg.



Anastasiya YarovenkoPreis der Kunsthalle Wien 2015

Anastasiya Yarovenko, one of the two recipients of the 2015 Kunsthalle Wien Prize, makes work concerned with the body’s relationship to societal structures, behaviors, and space. In her installation Mimicry at Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz, the Ukrainian-born artist assembled a selection of objects that don’t represent any definitive state but that possess the potential to interact with the viewer or surroundings. These objects consist of collapsible and modular furniture-like elements, as well as seemingly nonfunctional sculptures made of light materials



Karina MendreczkyPreis der Kunsthalle Wien 2015

With delicate lyricism, Karina Mendreczky creates fictional landscapes using light and shadow. As one of two recipients of the 2015 Kunsthalle Wien Prize, she created the installation Thin Dream at Kunsthalle Wien Karlsplatz. Silhouettes of acrylic trees, whose details were hand-carved with an etching needle, were projected onto the back wall of the gallery to create the impression of actual large-format drawings.



Boy Vereecken (Ed.)Signature Strengths

The No-Frills book series was developed in the early 1980s as a translation of the non-branding strategy of supermarket staples to mass-market genre fiction. The result of research into this experimental series, Signature Strengths also includes complete reproductions of its books—Western, Mystery, Science Fiction, and Romance.



Geoff Cox, Jacob LundThe Contemporary Condition
Introductory Thoughts on Contemporaneity and Contemporary Art


What do we mean when we say that something is contemporary? And what should the designator “contemporary art” refer to? An immediate response would be that contemporary art is an art of the present, that it somehow addresses and expresses the present. But what is this present? What constitutes the present present or the contemporary contemporary? This first book in the Contemporary Condition series introduces some of the key issues concerning contemporaneity as a defining condition of our historical present. It thus acts as an extended preface to the series as a whole, calling for a rethinking of the deep structures of temporalization that render our present the way it is.



Jussi ParikkaA Slow, Contemporary Violence
Damaged Environments of Technological Culture


The contemporary moment is comprised of many overlapping speeds, rhythms, and periods of time. A central theme of Jussi Parikka’s book concerns slowness instead of acceleration: a different sort of a temporal horizon in order to understand some of the environmental temporalities that media and technological arts are involved in. This is approached through art and design practices that unfold this multiplicity of time, closely entwined with contemporary concerns in aesthetic theory, to understand and engage with the planetary time scales of slow environmental violence.



Terry SmithThe Contemporary Composition

Can we speak of composition when we are in a state of unfathomable decomposition? Art being made today defies coherent categorization, and the world presents itself, day after day, as spinning into confused chaos, structural disintegration, and violent disorder. Revising his well-known histories of contemporary art, Terry Smith argues that we must respond to the compelling need for coeval composition at a time defined by the contemporaneity of divisive difference. This book traces how—despite many obstacles—visual artists across the globe are rising to this challenge.



Lawrence Abu Hamdan[inaudible]
A Politics of Listening in 4 Acts


A “politics of listening” is an intervention into and a reorganization of forms that listening takes rather than a call for free speech or for a platform for voices to be heard. Listening is a political act, a pedagogical process, and an activity that can lead to the development of an organized protocol for engagement. In his art and research, Beirut-based artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan explores the perception of language, sound, and listening. National identity, human rights, and the administration of justice are recurrent themes in his work.



Gordon BennettBe Polite

Gordon Bennett: Be Polite follows the exhibition of largely unseen works on paper by one of Australia’s most visionary and critical artists, Gordon Bennett (1955–2014). The exhibition and publication are the first to present the work of Bennett since his death. Though rarely seen in exhibition contexts, Bennett’s drawing and writing formed the foundation of his practice.



Nicholas ManganLimits to Growth

This publication accompanies Australian multidisciplinary artist Nicholas Mangan’s survey exhibition “Limits to Growth.” The exhibition and book bring together four of Mangan’s most significant works of the past seven years, alongside a new commission. The works in the show tackle narratives from his own geographical region—Asia Pacific, in which his home country of Australia plays a colonial role—and weaves them into a bigger picture to take into account the global economy, resource extraction, and the ultimate power of the sun.



Angela Bulloch, Maria ZerresConsidering Dynamics and the Forms of Chaos

This volume accompanies the eponymous exhibition at the Sharjah Art Museum—two parallel solo shows by Angela Bulloch and Maria Zerres brought together under one title, framed by the notion of entropy. A key term that characterizes the movement toward chaos, entropy appears in a variety of fields such as physics, probability theory, sociology and information technology. Within contemporary art, entropy has emerged to refer to installations often associated with representations of order, disorder and information, and their homogeneity.



Tirdad ZolghadrTraction

Traction argues that contemporary art is defined by a moral economy of indeterminacy that allows curators and artists to imagine themselves on the other side of power. This self-positioning, in turn, leaves us politically bankrupt, intellectually stagnant, and aesthetically predictable. In his memoir-polemic, curator and writer Tirdad Zolghadr candidly reflects on his own experiences and the work of others.



Jill MagidThe Proposal
Critical Spatial Practice 8


The eighth volume of the Critical Spatial Practice series focuses on Jill Magid’s “The Barragán Archives,” a multiyear project that examines the legacy of Pritzker Prize–winning architect Luis Barragán (1902–1988), and questions forms of power, public access, and copyright that construct artistic legacy.



Keren CytterA–Z Life Coaching

An incomplete guide for life. Each person written about is represented by a letter, and when an object turns into a subject it is marked in bold.

This book was written from the middle. The contents of these pages have been modified numerous times. Notes were taken, ideas were rewritten—the ones that survived bare the most essential guidelines and wisdom for life




Shezad DawoodKalimpong

Kalimpong is an artist project in book form by the London-based artist Shezad Dawood. Set in Kalimpong at various moments from 1912 to the present day, Dawood’s project is part fact, part fiction. There are explorers and spies, poets and travelers, lovers and strangers, princesses and humanoids, all strangely connected across the globe through this curious Indian town.



Francis McKeeHow to Know What’s Really Happening

In this post-truth era, how does one navigate the endless information available and choose a viable narrative of reality? In How to Know What’s Really Happening Glasgow-based writer and curator Francis McKee looks at various techniques for determining verity, from those of spy agencies and whistle-blowers to mystics and scientists.



David HarveyAbstract from the Concrete

Marxist geographer David Harvey opened his lecture with a fact: between 2011 and 2013 China consumed 50 percent more cement than the United States had in the entire twentieth century. In Abstract from the Concrete, he asks why. Spiraling outward—geographically and materially—Harvey travels from the building industry in China to the foreclosed housing market in the United States to the automobile industry in São Paolo and back again. The why emerges as a direct result of “anti-value,” of capital in crisis—intrinsic, he contends, to capital and capital cities today.



Irena HaidukSeductive Exacting Realism

A 13-volume set of Marcel Proust’s collected works was published in Yugoslavia in 1967. This edition, in the Latin alphabet, was highly valued by Yugoslav intelligentsia for its elegant translation from French by the poet Tin Ujević. During the Bosnian civil war, these Proust sets fetched up to the equivalent of a full year’s salary in the Belgrade black markets. They were frequently looted together with other valuables from Bosnian homes. The set exhibited in Irena Haiduk's “Seductive Exacting Realism” was seized by local police from Belgrade Kalenić Market in 1995. It was acquired at a public auction in 2014. It is missing volume number 12.



Ingo NiermannSolution 257: Complete Love

It’s 2011, late summer. All over Europe, young people are occupying central public squares to demonstrate for more social justice. In Berlin, their agenda is different. The completists gathered at Alexanderplatz aspire for justice primarily on an intimate level. They believe that only when the redistribution of material wealth includes equal chances of finding sex and love—no matter how elderly, disabled, or ugly you are—communism will become real.




Michalis Pichler (Ed.)Books and Ideas after Seth Siegelaub

Books and Ideas after Seth Siegelaub spans an arc of tension between the works of Seth Siegelaub and contemporary cultural production. It features an interview with Seth Siegelaub, two essays by Regine Ehleiter and Michalis Pichler, and an extensively illustrated catalogue with bibliographic details.



Sabeth Buchmann, Ilse Lafer, Constanze Ruhm (Eds.)Putting Rehearsals to the Test
Practices of Rehearsal in Fine Arts, Film, Theater, Theory, and Politics


Although the format of the rehearsal is used across a number of disciplines—film and theater as well as fine arts—it has been scarcely considered in historical and contemporary art discourses. With this in mind, Putting Rehearsals to the Test investigates the role and function of the rehearsal as a methodology, modus operandi, medium, site of representation, and reflection on processes of artistic production.



Samuel Bianchini, Emanuele Quinz (Eds.)Behavioral Objects I
A Case Study: Céleste Boursier-Mougenot


What exactly is a behavioral object? How can it be analyzed, understood, theorized, experienced, and how can we conceive of works that possess the faculty of action and reaction to their environment and public? Examining three works by Céleste Boursier-Mougenot, this book tackles these questions and defines a new field of research and practice.



Pauline Boudry/Renate Lorenz I Want

This publication documents the major film installation I Want (2015) by collaborative artists Pauline Boudry and Renate Lorenz. The double-projection film installation is based on a script that borrows texts from American punk-poet Kathy Acker, as well as chats and materials by convicted whistle-blower Chelsea Manning that speak of her reasons for revealing nearly one million secret military and diplomatic documents through WikiLeaks, at the same time exposing her transgender identity to her superiors. Through poetic gestures of appropriation and recombination, Boudry and Lorenz examine issues around gender, sexuality, the performance of identity, and the nature of collaboration.



T. J. DemosDecolonizing Nature
Contemporary Art and the Politics of Ecology


While ecology has received little systematic attention within art history, its visibility and significance has grown worldwide in relation to the pressing threats of climate change, global warming, and environmental destruction. By engaging artists’ widespread aesthetic and political engagement with environmental conditions and processes around the globe—looking at cutting-edge theoretical, political, and cultural developments in the Global South and North—Decolonizing Nature offers a significant and original contribution to the intersecting fields of art history, ecology, visual culture, geography, and environmental politics.



Barbara Gronau, Matthias von Hartz, Carolin Hochleichter (Eds.)How to Frame
On the Threshold of Performing and Visual Arts


From 2012 to 2016, Foreign Affairs, the international performing arts festival of Berliner Festspiele, and the Berlin University of the Arts (UdK) have been investigating the relations between the performing and visual arts. The festival has continuously produced projects with international artists that experiment with various institutional frameworks. This book is both a question and a manual, collecting ideas, knowledge and experiences that stem from the theory and practices developed over the past few years.



The Baltic Atlas

“It is impossible, but as you do not know it is impossible, it might be possible.”
—Lolita Jablonskiene, Director of the National Gallery of Art, Vilnius, commenting on previous attempts to organize a joint pavilion including all three Baltic States for the Venice Biennale




Kate CooperLOOK BOOK

Through her videos, exhibitions, and photographic works, Kate Cooper explores the role of gender and what agency images might possess in and of themselves. Producing images becomes akin to building infrastructure; her computer-generated bodies are imbued with power and put to work. This publication accompanies the first institutional solo show by Cooper, winner of the 2014 Schering Stiftung Art Award. Cooper returns to the CGI female models used in her exhibition at KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin, to create a new series of works situated within the fictional space of the lookbook. 



Bulletins of The Serving Library #11Summer 2016

Released to inaugurate The Serving Library’s new red, gold, and green space in Liverpool, this issue is both printed in and concerned with color. It includes Emily Gephart’s account of the Spectra Poetry Hoax of 1916, a truncated phone call from Dexter Sinister to Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, the late, great Muhammad Ali discussing skin color in a 1971 TV interview, reflections on the history of Chroma-key green by Lucas Benjamin, a personal history of paint and painting by Amy Sillman, and further contributions by T. E. White, Umberto Eco, Stuart Bertolotti-Bailey, Tamara Shopsin, and James Langdon.



Lívia Páldi, Olav Westphalen (Eds.)Dysfunctional Comedy
A Reader


Dysfunctional Comedy documents a series of public events, performances, and workshops conceptualized by German-American artist Olav Westphalen and organized with different partners, mainly in Sweden, between 2012 and 2015. An intersection of practices, ideas, and images, this artist’s book/catalogue engages with representatives of different traditions and genres in comedic and cartoonist practices to reflect on the rich history of stand-up comedy and political satire.



Apple. An Introduction(Over and over and once again)

A supplement to exhibitions held at Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach, and Muzeum Sztuki, Łódź, this book centers around the apple as an art object and as a case study in biodiver sity under threat. Developed over the course of an ongoing, five-year correspondence between artist Antje Majewski and the Polish conceptual artist Paweł Freisler, the project explores the idea of diversity in all of its possible meanings and manifestations, tying together collaborative and associatively connected works by Majewski and Agnieszka Polska, Freisler, Piotr Życieński, and Jimmie Durham in a museum exhibition dealing with the apple.



Vanessa Joan Müller, Cristina Ricupero, Nicolaus Schafhausen (Eds.)New Ways of Doing Nothing

“New Ways of Doing Nothing,” a group exhibition that took place at Kunsthalle Wien in 2014, devoted itself to artistic production that opposes activity and instead gives an affirmative slant to forms of doing nothing or refraining—a major influence being the titular character of Hermann Melville’s “Bartleby the Scriviner: A Story of Wall Street.” The book presents the displayed works and artists, but also continues the process that led to the exhibition. Included along with a conversation between the curators is a text collage of reprints and excerpts that introduces those artists and thinkers who, in the words of Bartleby, “prefer not to.”



Markus MiessenCrossbenching
Toward Participation as Critical Spatial Practice


“At the heart of this book is a simple and profound proposition: to ‘do' architecture is to immerse oneself in a conflictual process of material production—participation is not a productive encounter of multiple practitioners and stakeholders, but a set of conflicts, negotiations, maneuvers, and swindles between and within a multiplicity of agents, human and nonhuman alike—equally including architects, clients, financiers, and builders, say, but also silicon, plastic, concrete, each with its conflicting aims and different material means to achieve them.”
—Eyal Weizman




Florian Malzacher, Ahmet Öğüt, Pelin Tan (Eds.)The Silent University
Towards a Transversal Pedagogy


The Silent University, initiated by artist Ahmet Öğüt in 2012, is an autonomous platform for academics who cannot share their knowledge due to their status of residence, because their degrees are not recognized or regaining access to academia is blocked for other reasons. It is a solidary school by refugees, asylum seekers and migrants who contribute to the program as lecturers, consultants and researchers.



Abraham Adams, Lou Cantor (Eds.)Intersubjectivity Vol. 1
Language and Misunderstanding


Intersubjectivity, a two-volume collection of essays, is concerned with a new account of our ideas of what subjects are, and what it means for them to meet. The first volume, Language and Misunderstanding, addresses concretism and its discontents. The essays and performance texts herein argue for an expanded consideration of concretism in contemporary practices oriented toward the embodiment of language, in works that challenge the privileging of the body of the word over the body of the artist. 



James Voorhies (Ed.)What Ever Happened to New Institutionalism?

New Institutionalism, a mode of curating that originated in Europe in the 1990s, evolved from the legacy of international curator Harald Szeemann, the relational art advanced by French critic and theorist Nicolas Bourriaud, and other influential factors of the time. New Institutionalism’s dispersed and varied approaches to curating sought to reconfigure the art institution from within, reshaping it into an active, democratic, open, and egalitarian public sphere. These approaches posed other possibilities and futures for institutions and exhibitions, challenging the consensual conception, production, and distribution of art.



Florian Hecker
John McCracken


Following the 2015 exhibition “Florian Hecker/John McCracken” at Künstlerhaus, Halle für Kunst & Medien Graz, this publication probes the experimental capacity of the white-cube space of the gallery. For the exhibition, two complementary yet autonomous artists were brought into dialogue with each other: German artist and computer composer Florian Hecker, and the late American sculptor John McCracken.



Fredrik VærslevAll Around Amateur

Fredrik Værslev’s work navigates between different painterly traditions, and demonstrates the possibilities and relevance of the medium today. He treats his paintings as objects, often created through more or less laborious, serial, or deterministic processes where time itself, as well as various external factors, become active cocreators in the making of the work. Published in conjunction with Værselv’s exhibition “All Around Amateur” at the Bergen Kunsthall and Le Consortium, Dijon, this publication comes in two different versions, with each book comprising 320 one-to-one digital images scanned from eight of Værslev’s new “sunset” paintings.




Helge Mooshammer, Peter MörtenböckVisual Cultures as Opportunity

In the fourth volume of the series Visual Cultures as..., Helge Mooshammer and Peter Mörtenböck analyze the networked spaces of global informal markets, the cultural frontiers of speculative investments, and recent urban protests, and discuss crucial shifts in the process of collective articulation within today’s “crowd economy.”



Els Silvrants-Barclay, Pieternel Vermoortel (Eds.)Cave 1—Territories

Cave is a series of publications featuring commissioned and republished explorations, anecdotes, research, documents, case studies, essays, and scenarios on how to think and practice contemporary collecting. The first issue of Cave looks into the territory of the public collection considering it both a semantic ground for institutional collecting as well as political and cultural infrastructure.



John Douglas MillarBrutalist Readings
Essays on Literature


John Douglas Millar’s Brutalist Readings: Essays on Literature is a significant intervention into recent debates on the place of literature and writing in the context of contemporary art. Featuring essays on the highs and lows of the conceptual turn in poetics, avant-garde literary genealogies, and monographic pieces on Paul B. Preciado, Chris Kraus, and Pierre Guyotat, among others, Brutalist Readings explores the radical histories of writing, as well as its potential now.



PresenceA Conversation at Cabaret Voltaire, Zurich

Recently, the idea of “presence” has returned to the arts, humanities, and social sciences. In February 2013, in Zurich’s historical Cabaret Voltaire, which was central to the Dada movement almost a hundred years ago, an experimental international symposium took place that put presence under the microscope.



Jens Hoffmann (Ed.)United States of Latin America

This publication documents the exhibition “United States of Latin America,” held at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD), in collaboration with the Kadist Art Foundation. Bringing together their shared and ongoing engagement with artistic practices from Latin America, Jens Hoffmann and Pablo León de la Barra have assembled one of the most significant contemporary survey’s of recent art from the region.



Simon Battisti, Leah Whitman-Salkin, Åbäke (Eds.)I Have Left You the Mountain

“I Have Left You the Mountain” presents ten new texts written by contemporary writers and thinkers on the architecture of displacement. These texts have been set to music and sung by some of the last remaining groups of Albanian iso-polyphonic singers, an art form now protected as “intangible cultural heritage” by UNESCO.



Lara FavarettoAgeing Process

Ageing Process, Lara Favaretto’s first monograph, documents the artist’s works from the 1990s to her most recent installations presented in the 2015 exhibition “Good Luck!” at MAXXI in Rome. Structured like a manual, this volume accompanies entries on her works with essays by critics and experts from various disciplines who tackle themes complementary but not directly connected to the artist’s practice.



Charlemagne PalestineGesammttkkunnsttMeshuggahhLaandttttt

Charlemagne Palestine works from a highly personal universe of ritual, intoxication, and shamanism. Over the last four decades the artist has created an extensive body of experimental musical compositions, bodily performances, and, in later years, visual artworks inhabited by stuffed animals. To Palestine, teddy bears figure as powerful shamanic totems, which he fondly calls “divinities.”



Josephine Meckseper10 minutes after

10 minutes after features installation views from Josephine Meckseper’s recent exhibition at Timothy Taylor, a gallery of “psychoimages,” and two newly commissioned texts. Independent curator and writer Piper Marshall considers ideas of détournement, the readymade, and base materialism in Meckseper’s oeuvre, while writer and editor Domenick Ammirati explores the significance of painting and text within Meckseper’s installations.



Ina BlomThe Autobiography of Video
The Life and Times of a Memory Technology


In her innovative take on early video art, Ina Blom considers the widespread notion that video technology was endowed with lifelike memory and agency. She follows the reflexive unfolding of an analog technology that seemed to deploy artists and artistic frameworks in the creation of new technical and social realities. Blom documents, among other things, video’s emergence through the framework of painting, its identification with biological life, its exploration of the outer limits of technical and mental time control, and its construction of new realms of labor and collaboration. 



Susanne KriemannDuskdust

Duskdust is an artist book by Susanne Kriemann. It takes as its starting point the former industrial site of limestone mining at Furilden peninsula on the northeastern coast of Gotland, Sweden’s biggest island. It is informed by the artist’s ongoing preoccupation with photography, labor, and archaeology and includes photographs taken during her residencies and site visits, archival material as well as text contributions by invited authors.



Olivia Plender Rise Early, Be Industrious

As the first significant overview of the work by artist Olivia Plender, this monograph navigates through the evolving attitudes to historical and contemporary forms of communication and education that her research-based practice has explored for the last ten years.



Transparenzen/TransparenciesThe Ambivalence of a New Visibility /
Zur Ambivalenz einer neuen Sichtbarkeit


The globalized world seems at once transparent and opaque. The exhibition project “Transparencies” examined the cultural facets and atmospheres of these (non-)transparencies. The two-part, joint exhibition project in Bielefeld and Nuremberg was dedicated to developments in “transparent society,” asking how these are reflected in the current work by contemporary artists.



Hugo Boss Asia Art
Award for Emerging Asian Artists 2015


This substantial publication presents the shortlisted artists for the HUGO BOSS ASIA ART Award for Emerging Asian Artists 2015, and the accompanying exhibition at the Rockbund Art Museum. The art prize aims to put into practice and to question intra-Asia art connections, gaps, and combinations that build very active art scenes from specific contexts to ongoing extensions. In their work, the six finalists—Guan Xiao, Huang Po-Chih, Moe Satt, Maria Taniguchi, Vandy Rattana, and Yang Xinguang—reflect, build, and imagine new art scenes in such different contexts as Cambodia, Mainland China, Myanmar, Philippine, and Taiwan.




Markus Miessen, Yann Chateigné (Eds.)The Archive as a Productive Space of Conflict

The applied research project and publication The Archive as a Productive Space of Conflict deals with archival practice and its spatial repercussions. Inquiring whether any accumulation and organization of knowledge is productive—to the effect that it generates a narrative and/or history—the project focuses specifically on archives becoming productive due to their spatial framework.



Annette Gilbert (Ed.)Publishing as Artistic Practice

What does it mean to publish today? In the face of a changing media landscape, institutional upheavals, and discursive shifts in the legal, artistic, and political fields, concepts of ownership, authorship, work, accessibility, and publicity are being renegotiated. How the traditional publishing framework has been cast adrift, and which opportunities are surfacing in its stead, is discussed here by artists, publishers, and scholars through the examination of recent publishing concepts emerging from the experimental literature and art scene, where publishing is often part of an encompassing artistic practice.



Wendelien van OldenborghAmateur

Amateur is the first comprehensive publication about Wendelien van Oldenborgh’s moving image works, and their accompanying installations. Developed over the past ten years of her practice, these works explore communication and interaction between individuals, often against the backdrop of a unique public location, in order to cast attention on repressed, incomplete, and unresolved histories.



Frederick KieslerFunction Follows Vision, Vision Follows Reality

This collection of unpublished or rare texts by Frederick Kiesler written between 1927 and 1957 focuses on Kiesler’s ideas on display, and juxtaposes works of contemporary artists with a number of original drawings by Kiesler.



Eva Grubinger Black Diamond Bay

Eva Grubinger’s exhibition explores the idea of psychological landscapes—a physical or mental journey—that evokes ideas of escapism and the search for the self. Released in conjunction with the show, this catalogue features visual documentation of the exhibition by Sylvain Deleu, and an accompanying text by Fatoş Üstek.



Nav Haq (Ed.)Syntax and Society
The Abraaj Group Art Prize 2016


This double publication offers further investigation into the work of the recipients and shortlisted artists of ninth installment of The Abraaj Group Art Prize. Syntax and Society, the first volume, reflects on the exhibition premise that considered the structure and meaning of language and the role it plays in society, with a focus on the work of the three shortlisted artists, Dina Danish, Mahmoud Khaled, and Basir Mahmood while the second volume, Oh Shining Star Testify, focuses on the work of award-winning artist duo Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme.



Chen ZhenWithout going to New York and Paris, life could be internationalized

This catalogue presents an art-historical angle on Chen Zhen’s unique way of questioning his experience of globalization through art. It includes documentation of the eponymous exhibition at Rockbund Art Museum (May 30–October 7, 2015), along with detailed sketches of both existing and unrealized projects.



Isabelle Graw, Ewa Lajer-Burcharth (Eds.) Painting beyond Itself
The Medium in the Post-medium Condition


In response to recent developments in pictorial practice and critical discourse, Painting beyond Itself: The Medium in the Post-medium Condition seeks new ways to approach and historicize the question of the medium. Reaching back to the earliest theoretical and institutional definitions of painting, this book—based on a conference at Harvard University in 2013—focuses on the changing role of materiality in establishing painting as the privileged practice, discourse, and institution of modernity.



Luca Lo Pinto, Nicolaus Schafhausen, Anne-Claire Schmitz (Eds.)Individual Stories

Photographs, books, and knickknacks: artists collect a variety of objects. While artists generate personal collections, which often address different formal, aesthetic, or conceptual concerns, it is difficult to separate this activity from their artistic practices. Over time, whether intended or not, such accumulations of items may become works of art. Individual Stories considers the collection as a portrait of its collector and also as an artistic method—as a process rather than an end result. This catalogue is a compilation of individual collections that could not be more different.




John C. WelchmanPast Realization: Essays on Contemporary European Art
XX–XXI, Vol. 1


This volume is a collection of dynamic and engaged writings by art historian John C. Welchman on a range of contemporary European artists: Vasco Araújo, Cosima von Bonin, Jan De Cock, Orshi Drozdik, Susan Hiller, Andy Hope 1930, Michael Kunze, Nathaniel Mellors, Miguel Palma, José Álvaro Perdices, Sascha Pohle, Thomas Raat, Nicola Stäglich, and Xavier Veil­han. Anchored in concerns that emerged in the late 1960s and 1970s, Welchman poses thoughtful and provocative questions about how these artists receive and negotiate the social and aesthetic histories through which they live and work. 



Shahryar NashatObituary

The subject of this book is a deceased prop, an object of a particular color, the green of cinematic trickery and special effects. It edged itself into Shahryar Nashat’s work in 2011, first appearing in Factor Green, an installation the artist produced for the Venice Biennale. Taking its final form a year later, the prop became properly known as La Shape. Accompanied by archival images and a series of portraits that Nashat made during La Shape’s most prolific years, Obituary is a gripping read into a most mysterious icon and a timely consideration of the roles played, and agency expressed, by such a highly mediated art object.




Felicity D. ScottDisorientation: Bernard Rudofsky in the Empire of Signs
Critical Spatial Practice 7


In the seventh volume of the Critical Spatial Practice series, architectural historian Felicity D. Scott revisits the Viennese émigré architect’s readings of the vernacular both in the United States and Japan, which resonate with his attempts to imagine architecture and cities that refused to communicate in a normative sense. Rudofsky’s unconventional musings take on a heightened resonance in a contemporary world saturated with visual information.



Bulletins of The Serving Library #10Winter 2015

This tenth volume is a “sampler” issue comprising one choice Bulletin from each of the previous nine. From now on, Bulletins of The Serving Library will proceed in full color and at half its former size (but will be twice as good).



Boris Ondreička, Nadim Samman (Eds.)Rare Earth

Rare Earth is an attempt to define the spirit of an age. Exploring how today’s myths, identities, and cosmologies relate to current advances in technology—through reference to the material basis to our most developed weapons and tools; a class of seventeen rare earth elements from the periodic table—Rare Earth challenges the rhetoric of immateriality associated with our hypermodern condition.



Jesko Fezer & Studio Experimentelles Design (Eds.)Öffentliche Gestaltungsberatung—Public Design Support 2011–2016

An experiment with alternative forms of design, Public Design Support is also an intervention in urban life. It helps local residents and others to shape their lifeworld and explore possibilities for action, instead of the usual experience of powerlessness and marginalization in the face of urban development. Public Design Support offers free practical help in dealing with everyday problems while also helping to develop alternative conceptions of the city. This publication—which includes key project materials, scholarly essays, and significant historical texts—chronicles the aspirations, methods, and projects of the first four years of Public Design Support.




Roee RosenThe Blind Merchant

An artist book juxtaposing text and image, history and its revision, The Blind Merchant was produced from 1989 to 1991. The work is composed of three elements: the complete text of Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice; a “parasitical” text written by Roee Rosen that runs alongside the play, adopting the perspective of the principal antagonist Shylock, the Jewish moneylender; and 145 drawings that present an alternative approach to the drama’s staging and casting of characters—Shylock is depicted as the blind merchant with drawings made by the artist while blindfolded.